Early Morning Marsh

Early Morning Marsh

“Early Morning Marsh”, oil, 5 x 7″, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

“Early Morning Marsh”, oil, 5 x 7″, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

The morning golden hour when the sun rakes across the marsh, lighting the trees just across the creek. Edisto Island was just starting to wake up from winter.

The greens were just popping out in the grasses when I took the photo reference here. So the dominant color in the marsh was the full range of lavender and violet overlaid with gold.

That time of day can be so silent that the only sound is the plop of a fish jumping. The perfect time to meditate with a cup of coffee in hand.

Cedars on the Dunes

Cedars on the Dunes

“Cedars on the Dunes” Oil on panel, 6 x 6”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Back when I started my first daily painting project I was profoundly homesick for the Lowcountry, for the SC/GA coastal plain where the skies are enormous, the marshes wide open, and the air smells of salt and pluff mud.

But I was “stuck” back then, in more ways than one, in a totally different environment. To get unstuck, I decided to paint my way out of it by painting the landscape I was in everyday.

It worked. I ended up falling in love with where I was.

AND now here I am spending most of my time back in the Lowcountry as a result.

I’ve started another daily painting project and you guessed, all focused on the rich gumbo that’s the culture of the Lowcountry.

I’m sharing sneak peeks of these paintings with my VIP email list first.

The strength and resilience of the cedars that hold down the sand dunes drew me in for this first in the project. But the old rice fields and marshes are calling too.

You may not be able to travel to the Lowcountry right now, but I can bring the Lowcountry to you.

Stay resilient, my friend! Just like the cedars.

And wash your hands.

~Mary

Under Summer Clouds

Under Summer Clouds

“Under Summer Clouds”, oil, 4 x 6”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Under Summer Clouds

4 x 6″”

Oil on panel

It’s ironic that under summer storm clouds colors look more intense without the sun to bleach them out. The humidity doesn’t cloud the atmosphere as much either so the greens of the trees and new growth of cotton are vivid and rich.

$235 (unframed) + $10 shipping

 

Summer, Morning Storm

Summer, Morning Storm

“Summer, Morning Storm”, oil, 7 x 5”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Summer Morning Storm

5 x 7″

Oil on panel

A sudden heavy burst of rain moves across the summer hay fields…

$325.00 (unframed) + $15.00 shipping

 

Red Cedars, Bent Not Broken

Red Cedars, Bent Not Broken

Red Cedars, Bent Not Broken

5 x 7″

Oil on panel

These red cedars line the edge of the marsh at Lazaretto Creek, Fort Pulaski.

I’m fascinated by their tenacity and resilience.

They grow and thrive at the edge of the marshes and shore, turning and bending with the winds and storms.

Forms and shapes are a record of their surviving life’s challenges.

We can do the same. Stay resilient, my friends!

$325.00 (unframed) + $15.00 shipping

 

| Winter Light, Fort Pulaski | $325

| Winter Light, Fort Pulaski | $325

 

| Winter Light, Fort Pulaski | 6 x 6”, oils, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson
$325 (unframed) + $15 shipping

 

 

The temperature of a Southern winter is variable. 80 degrees one day. Then  a stiff cold wind and a high 40 degrees color the next.

But it sure is hard to beat the gorgeous winter light. The last light across the marshes along Lazaretto Creek at Fort Pulaski.