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Relative Color: Why Color Relationships Are Important

Relative Color: Why Color Relationships Are Important

Relative Color: Why Color Relationships Are Important

Are you seeing how inter-connected colors are?

How we “see” a color is influenced by the colors surrounding it.

Paying close attention to color relationships, what’s known as relative color, is a crucial part of both learning to see and to paint.

In this video I’ve got a quick demo to show you how our perception of color shifts depending on its context.

Rough Transcript:

I’ve been thinking a lot over the last day, about one of my favorite quotes from Wayne Thiebaud. He said that as far as I’m concerned, there is only one study, and that is the way in which things relate to one another. I think that that really encapsulates everything about painting, looking at paintings and learning how to see, how to see the world, especially how to see color.

You know, Thiebaud passed away just day before yesterday, on Christmas Day. So I think he’s on the top of mind for a lot of us artists.

Thiebaud was a colorist. He was a master colorist. And if you look at just the edge of a shadow of an object, one object within his painting, you’re going to see an entire range of colors from warm to cool light, to dark, bright, to dull and everything in between, because he knew how to look closely, mostly at the subjects that he was painting and how to remember that and how to translate that experience into paint.

So I want to think about, and talk to you today a little bit about how to process what he meant by that, how to take that idea of the interconnectedness of everything, the interconnectedness in particular of colors and apply that to painting.

We have a tendency or really strong tendency to see objects and colors as individual elements and not look at how they’re related to each other. We’re kind of hard wired that way as predators, but it means that we sometimes skim over the relationships and we need to kind of zoom back out and take into account how they’re connected.

We need to look not just at the thing, but the thing that’s next to the thing. The key to understanding color is to understand that we perceive a color in relationship to the collar next to it. So how we interpret that color as being lighter, dark, brighter closer to red or closer to green, or warmer or cooler.

We see all of that in relationship to the color it’s next to, not in isolation. That’s the key to learning to see, and then to go from seeing to being able to create that experience in your own paintings, whether you’re an observational, representational painter or not, it’s a real key to understanding how colors interact with each other and how your viewer is going to look at them.

So let me show you some examples of what I’m talking about on a really simple level. Let’s take a look at how our perception of color shifts depending on the color next to it.

We’re going to be working with this fairly neutral blue, gray, and then comparing it to other colors based on their value, intensity and their temperature.

Let’s dive in.

I’m going to create over here a nice square of our blue gray.

Give us two of them and we’re going to compare value.

I’m getting a lot of texture in there as well, unintentionally.

So I’m going to compare one with a really dark color. This is a dark purple.

I kinda liked that that little strip of blue gray ended up there in the middle of it.

And then we’re going to go with a light, slightly more intense blue.

What we can see there is exactly same blue, gray appears lighter when it’s next to a dark color because of contrast and it appears darker next to a light color. So these two do not appear to be the exact same value. Colors influence each other.

And our next one, we’re going to take. Let’s see if I can scrape this a little thinner so that it’s going to read a little flatter and we’re not going to get so much cast shadow.

And in our next one, we’re going to look at, that was value, we’re going to go to intensity.

So I have a slightly duller, terracotta color. It’s a slightly dark orange, and we’re going to put that here in the top comparison. And then we’re going to go with a more intense version of the same color underneath.

This color is more pure, more intense. Top one is duller.

And what will happen when we are comparing. dull to dull, and bright to dull, is that the blue gray here will appear a little bit more blue because it’s next to its close compliment up here.

The blue gray appears not as intense. It’s a little bit dollar because this orange is not as intense as the. So the intensity of the color it’s next to is going to affect our perception of the intensity of the original color.

So scrape this one down too. And this time we’re going to look at the temperature, the apparent, warmth, or coolness of the.

And we’re going to compare what it looks like when it’s up against a warmer color and when it’s up against a cooler color and how that shifts our perception. So for our warmer color, we have.

Rather for our cooler color, we have a fairly intense blue. It’s ultra Marine blue mixed with white.

So there’s our cooler.

And we’re going to compare that with our warmer Terra cotta color.

And what we’ll see is how does our perception of its temperature shifts.

So here where we’re comparing temperature, the blue gray appears warmer when it’s next to a cool color. It appears cooler when it’s next to a warm. It appears lighter when it’s next to a dark color and darker. When it’s next to a light color, it appears more intense when it’s next to an intense color and dollar when it’s next to adult color.

So hope this gives you some ideas of ways that you can explore. And understand more the interconnectedness, the relationships between colors. So I want to wrap up by going back to what Wayne Teebo said and applying it specifically to color that he said that the way in which things relate to one another is the.

And that is the key to learning, to see color and to be able to really implement it effectively in your paintings. So keep in mind that you’re going to be able to translate that by understanding, contrast how color is similar or different and how value, intensity and temporary. So I hope that’s been helpful and that y’all have been having a great holiday period here.

We’re in that in-between law between Christmas and new years. So if you’re looking for something to do, that’s not too heavy in the studio right now. I would suggest that. You explore a little bit and experiment with how colors shift and change when they’re up against different colors and you shift those aspects, do some observation of.

What you see and looking at those relationships, are they lighter or darker? Are they brighter or dollar? Are they warmer or cooler? Ask yourself those questions and let me know how it goes.

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5 Steps to Get a Unique Painting Style of Your Own

5 Steps to Get a Unique Painting Style of Your Own

“Storm over the Salt Marsh”, oil, 5 x 7″, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

“Storm over the Salt Marsh”, oil, 5 x 7″, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Have you wondered how to get a unique painting style of your own so that when people see your paintings, they know that you did it and not somebody else?

Well, today I’m going to talk about five different things that you can do so that you can begin to develop a style all of your own.

Rough Transcript:

You know, there really isn’t any magic formula. I wish there was, but there’s not. Style develops through the habit of simply making paintings. Kind of like the way you developed your style and handwriting as a kid.

Think about going back to first grade and your handwriting probably looked like about everybody else’s. Then by second grade you began to develop a little bit of individuality and mainly through practice.

But third grade you could recognize that you wrote it. And so could your mom, dad, and everybody else in the classroom.

I’m going to talk about the ways that you can apply the same strategies that made your own handwriting to creating your own personal style and painting.

#1 Explore & Experiment

The first thing I want you to do is experiment, test different things out, explore.

Until you’ve really explored all the different possibilities that there are out there, all the different options and techniques, you’re not going to know what it is that you want to dive into and explore more deeply.

So if you’re just getting started as a painter, don’t feel like you have to develop a style right away. In fact, you can’t. What you have to do first is explore, dive deep and just test out all of the different things that there are.

#2 Practice Your Craft – Paint!

Once you’ve picked a medium and a technique that you really enjoy, not what you think the market’s going to go for, but what you enjoy, then it’s time to spend a little more focus on number two, practicing your craft.

What I mean by that is you need to spend some time in front of the old easel with the brush in hand or the knife or whatever it is the tool is that you work with because that practice, that time that you spend on your craft is what really is at the heart and the core of developing a style.

It’s not going to happen without spending that time. It’s what happened between first and third grade. Remember that story about your handwriting?

In order to do this, one of the things you’re going to want to do is to develop a regular practice. Ideally, a daily one. And think about how you can integrate that into your regular life. Even if it’s just for a few minutes a day, doesn’t mean you have to make a painting a day, but it means you have to do something towards your practice every single day. If you don’t, the style part is not going to happen.

You got to paint.

So it doesn’t mean you necessarily need to do that old adage of 10,000 hours. I’m sure you’ve heard that before, but it does mean you’ve got to spend some time at the task and you can do that on your own.

You can be self-taught. There is nothing wrong with it. And you can work through the issues that are at hand and develop your own style, or you can sign up for workshops and classes and speed that process up, but there’s no replacement for time spent painting.

#3 Look at Other Art

Number three, and this is really important. Super simple. You got to look at other art. This is how you feed your imagination. One of the ways that you begin to realize all the different options that there are out there is to look at what other artists are doing.

Now, when I say this, I don’t mean go out and copy other artists. Not at all. Copying is not going to make you a better artist. Let me say that again. Copying other artists is not going to make you a better artist.

You can absolutely be influenced by other artists. But you’re going to learn the most from other artists by looking at what they’ve done, exploring the different techniques that they’ve used and how they have developed and woven their own lives, their own passions into their art.

#4 Focus on Painting WELL

Number four, it’s not enough just to paint because if you’re just painting and repeating the same errors over and over and over what you’re teaching yourself is to paint full of errors. It’s to make mistakes and then to keep reinforcing them.

So you want to practice painting well, That means get feedback from other people, whether it’s in a formal class or in a critique group or with a group of other artists.

We don’t always see our work with a lot of objectivity. Sometimes we’re our own worst critics. So in order to facilitate painting better, you’re going to learn faster if at the bare minimum you are sharing your work with other artists and getting feedback, if you are joining in crit groups, if you are participating in art, Facebook groups remember -we’ve got a free one.

And if you are joining classes and workshops and professional development, you’re going to speed that whole process up if you get some help and some training.

#5 Follow Your Curiosity & Interests

The fifth one is super important in a lot of ways.

I think it is as important is that second one, which was paint. So follow your curiosity and interests. What I mean by that is, paint the things that you love. Paint the things that fascinate you. Paint the things that you’re interested in because your passion around that subject is going to come through in what you do with it.

If you paint things that you don’t remotely find interesting, why in the world would you think the viewer would find it interesting? Not only that. You’ll begin to bore yourself and then you’ll stop painting. So, paint the things that you’re interested in and that will come through in your painting. It will inspire you to paint more.

Recap

Let’s go through those quickly again, just so that you can remember what those five tips are. Number one, experience, experiment, rather, and explore. Try lots of different techniques and options. Number two, practice your craft regularly. In other words, get in front of the easel, on preferably a daily basis, but at least on a regular basis. Develop the painting habit. Number three, look at other art. Look at the work of other artists. Feed your imagination. Get inspired. Number four is to focus on painting. Get some help, get into a critique group, get into a group of other artists. And number five is to follow your curiosity and interests.

I hope this has been helpful. And remember that it is absolutely possible to develop your own style. It happens quite naturally through the process of painting.

If this has been at all helpful, I’d love for you to share it with a friend and hope to see you again soon. Share your work with us over in the free Facebook group, over at ART+WORK+LIVING. Happy painting everybody! Bye-bye for now.

2021 webinar invitation

How to Use Value, Color, and Composition to Make Compelling Paintings

You're invited to a special free workshop I’m hosting where I'll share how you can leverage composition, value, and color to make compelling paintings. If you missed this earlier now's the time to save your seat.  You can learn more here and find a time that fits your schedule.

How I Learned to Paint Water

How I Learned to Paint Water

| High Tide, Winter | Oil on panel, 9 x 12”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

| High Tide, Winter | Oil on panel, 9 x 12”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

As an artist who paints the coast, water is one of my sources of inspiration. I love being close to it and the changing tides.

The way it changes with the light is mesmerizing, and I’m always looking for better ways to capture that in paint.

But like lots of artists I used to get caught up in some really common mistakes like using the same blue or grey color for the whole area of the water.

And not thinking about the effects of the land and sky on the values and reflections in the water.

Two things got me past all that.

The first is relatively easy but takes time, and that’s observing water so that you understand how it works.

Steamboat Landing, Edisto Island

Steamboat Landing, Edisto Island

I spend a lot of time watching water in all its forms in all kinds of weather.

But what if you’d like to speed that process up?

The second step I took was one a former professor suggested a long time ago. He said for any problem we faced as artists we could find the solution to it in the work of past artists.

To shorten that learning process, look at how other artists in the past have dealt with the problem of creating the illusion of water.

So here are the three key things I’ve learned from artists like Winslow Homer. These three are the most important to translating paint into the illusion of moving liquid.

Winslow Homer,

Winslow Homer, “The Gulf Stream”, ca. 1899, oil on canvas

Flow & Movement

  • The movement in water is determined by the direction of it’s flow
  • The faster the movement, the more ripples and white water there will be and fewer reflections
  • Less movement equals a more reflective surface
Winslow Homer,

Winslow Homer, “Sunset”, ca. 1875, oil on canvas

Reflections

  • Reflections have lower contrast than what they’re reflecting.
  • Reflections are impacted by perspective
  • Paint reflections down from the source

Color & Value

  • Look for the overall value pattern in the water, the big shapes, and realize they’re connected to the land
  • Include the colors used in the sky and land in the water as well

So where am I now on painting water?

“Spanish Hammock, Summer Storm”, oil, 18 x 24”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

“Spanish Hammock, Summer Storm”, oil, 18 x 24”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Being in the Lowcountry gives me lots of opportunities to watch and paint the water, from the ocean to meandering rivers, creeks and still swamps.

But looking at how other artists have dealt with those same challenges certainly gave me a head start.

If you’d like to speed up your own skill in capturing the many moods of water, sky and land, I'd love for you to join me in my upcoming live virtual workshop, CLOUD, SKY, LAND & WATER January 27-30. You can check it out by clicking here.

Clouds,-Sky,-Land-&-Water-web

Clouds, Sky, Land & Water: Painting the Southern Coast

4 Steps to Paint Skies More Effectively

4 Steps to Paint Skies More Effectively

“Congaree, Clouds and Fields, detail”, 8 x 10″, oil on archival panel

How to paint the skies doesn’t have to be that complicated or challenging.

The sky can be what really draws us to a painting subject.

But sometimes we can lose track of that along the way as we’re painting. And instead of focusing on the sky as something that can create a really dramatic element in the painting, something that is a critical part of the composition, we treated as an afterthought.

And when that happens, we’re not really taking full advantage of that thing that drew us to the subject in the first place.

I’ve got several steps right here to help you make it way more simple. Let’s dive right on in.

Number one, consider the sky as part of the overall composition.

“Winter Evening”, oil on panel, 5 x 7″

Think about the big shapes, the overall relationship of those shapes in the sky, to the composition as a whole pay attention to that overall pattern to the overall relationship of the cloud and sky for.

Number two is to be bold with your mark making.

“Congaree, Clouds and Fields”, oil on panel, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Don’t be afraid to think about treating the sky as an area that can be part of creating strong visual interest.

Use your largest brushes or knives.

Think about using thin versus thick paint.

Number three, study the colors, particularly the hues and the values that you see in the sky.

Variations in blue paint

Variations in blue paint

Practice observation.

What do I mean by that? Spend a good deal of time, looking in fact as much time looking as you do painting, the more you actually see, the more, you will see. Don’t let what you think, override what your eyeballs sees.

Vary the blues of a clear blue sky. There are lots of blues present in the sky and it changes from top to bottom and left to right. That’s based on where the sun is.

Use more than one blue as you’re mixing your colors. Don’t rely on one single tube of paint to try to create all the blues of your sky.

And remember that a clear blues or a clear sky isn’t always blue. Sometimes it’s orange. Sometimes it’s yellow. Sometimes it’s pink, sometimes violet and yes, it actually can be a pale green as well, depending on the atmosphere, conditions, the lighting, the time of day and the time of year. Also remember, look at the sky in relationship to the value of the lane.

The two things are connected. We have a tendency to automatically assume that the sky is always going to be like, Than the land. This is not always true. It’s usually true, but not always, for example, here, when we look at that photograph in black and white, we can tell that the clear blue sky at the top of the picture plane is significantly darker than the blue.

That’s close to the horizon, and it’s significantly darker than a chunk of the land. Trust your eye, not what your brain tells you. It already knows.

And then in our last tip, I want you to think about using atmospheric perspective.

Atmospheric perspective

Atmospheric perspective

Not the over-simplified form, that a lot of people recite by. But true atmospheric perspective, understanding that the impact of the atmosphere on color shape, form and edges is going to be dependent on where the sun is in relationship to where you’re looking.

If you’re looking away from the light, as in this image, Then you’re going to have diminishing contrast as you move towards the background. If you are looking towards the light as in this, oops, as in this photograph or this painting, then you’re going to have more contrast in the background than in the foreground, because you’re looking directly towards the.

And it’s going to create a silhouetting effect along the horizon line. Make sure you understand atmosphere perspective. Not real sure about it. I’ve got a link for you right here where you can dive into it a little bit more deeply.

Let’s review these four steps. One last time to wrap up here.

Number one, think about the sky as part of the overall composition. Not as an afterthought to the rest of your painting, make it a key component of it.

Number two is to be bold with your mark making. It’s going to add so much more visual interest to your composition.

Number three, pay close attention to the values and the Hughes and trust your eyeball and what you’ve observed last but not least.

Number four. Use atmospheric perspective. Think about where the light’s coming from.

If you’d like to speed up your own skill in capturing the many moods of water, sky and land, I'd love for you to join me in my upcoming live virtual workshop, CLOUD, SKY, LAND & WATER January 27-30. You can check it out by clicking here.

Clouds,-Sky,-Land-&-Water-web

Clouds, Sky, Land & Water: Painting the Southern Coast

How to Paint Clouds

How to Paint Clouds

Have you ever found painting clouds a challenge, or been unsure how to approach painting them? This episode’s for you.

Clouds and sky are just as important as land in a landscape painting. The two are integrally connected with what happens in the sky impacting the value pattern on the landscape below.

In this episode I want to share four things to help you see the clouds and sky, capture them on your paper or canvas, and use them to enhance your composition.

  • Seeing and Creating Form
  • Using Lost and Found Edges
  • Catching the Color and Light
  • Making Clouds Part of the Composition
“Clearing after Storms”, oil, 5 x 7”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

“Clearing after Storms”, oil, 5 x 7”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Seeing and Creating Form

Clouds are forms, very much like foliage masses. If you can begin to look at the overall forms of those clouds, it becomes so much easier to paint them.

Look for the basic shapes, the forms created by the planes of the clouds. I like to call it the “shoe box”. Think of the cloud form as a stack of shoe boxes with a different value for each plane.

Let’s look at this in one of John Constable’s cloud studies.

Constable_cloud_study

John Constable, 1776–1837, British, Cloud Study, 1822 Collection of the Yale Center for British Art (CC0 1.0 – Public Domain)

constable-study-with-box-web

John Constable, 1776–1837, British, Detail, Cloud Study, 1822 Collection of the Yale Center for British Art (CC0 1.0 – Public Domain)

Using Lost and Found Edges

Paying attention to edges is crucial with clouds. Be sure to include both soft and hard edges, but mainly soft ones. Clouds aren’t solid matter. They’re ephemeral and composed of particles of dust and moisture. So if you make all of your edges hard, your cloud will appear as a heavy, solid mass.

constable_cloud_detail_web

John Constable, 1776–1837, British, Detail, Cloud Study, 1822 Collection of the Yale Center for British Art (CC0 1.0 – Public Domain)

Catching the Color and Light

The key to capturing form and light in your clouds is how you use color. Avoid relying on black and white as the only colors you mix. Use a contrast in value (to create form) and temperature (to create light).

“Clearing after Storms”, oil, 5 x 7”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

“Clearing after Storms”, oil, 5 x 7”, © Mary Bentz Gilkerson

Making Clouds Part of the Composition

One of the challenges lots of artists face is paying a great deal of attention to the land and looking at the sky almost as an afterthought.

I want to encourage you to think of the sky as being just as important as the land and make it a crucial part of your composition.

You can do that in two different ways. Clouds can be the main focus of your composition or painting, or simply play a more supportive role. In either case they help to create a mood or sense of atmosphere.

cloud-photo-w-crop

Cloud reference photo with cropped version

Summary

  • Look for the basic forms and shapes in the clouds, and their overall pattern in the sky.
  • Use lost and found edges to capture the ephemeral quality of clouds.
  • Use value and temperature to create a sense of form and light.
  • Integrate the overall pattern shapes and values in the sky into your overall composition.

Thanks for being here!

Feel free to share this with friends. And if you’d like to dive deeper into the principles on composition, color, and light, check out my online course.

If you’d like to speed up your own skill in capturing the many moods of water, sky and land, I'd love for you to join me in my upcoming live virtual workshop, CLOUD, SKY, LAND & WATER January 27-30. You can check it out by clicking here.

Clouds,-Sky,-Land-&-Water-web

Clouds, Sky, Land & Water: Painting the Southern Coast

Your Color Mixing Guide: Gorgeous Neutral Colors from Yellow & Violet

Your Color Mixing Guide: Gorgeous Neutral Colors from Yellow & Violet

Mixing neutrals

Mixing neutrals

I want to share with you what I think of as being the secret sauce of color mixing: the neutral colors.

If you’ve been using more intense, saturated, rich color in your paintings, especially if you’re using optical color, like I’ve talked about so much, I want to make sure that you’re thinking about not just more intense colors, but that full range of intensity.

If you’ve got super-intense color, also include the neutrals in order to have that kind of contrast that’s really going to engage the viewer and compel them to look at your painting, which is what we all want.

Transcript:

If you were with me a couple of weeks ago, I did a quick demo on how you can use Indian yellow to create super rich yellows, all the way from cool lemon yellow to a really warm, dark cadmium, deep yellow. Or the equivalent thereof, because as y’all know, I don’t use cadmiums in the studio anymore. Well, I want to show you how you can use that same color, Indian yellow and yellow ochre, to create gorgeous fall neutral colors.

So we’re going to take Indian, yellow, yellow ochre, and violet, specifically dioxazine violet. Those two are a complimentary pair and we’re going to use those to create incredibly gorgeous, rich fall neutrals that you can use in your paintings. So let’s dive right in. 

Here, we’ve got the three colors that I want to work with in this demo. I want to show you what happens with a really super intense violet, Egyptian violet in Williamsburg, the same color in Gamblin is dioxazine purple, which is the actual pigment name. It is the compliment for yellow. And for yellow, we’ve got Indian yellow, and I’m also going to show you what happens when you modify that violet with a little bit of yellow ochre as well because yellow ochre is also a compliment color. It’s a slightly duller and cooler yellow.  

I want you to see how both of them look and how you can make some really rich, slightly muted colors as well as some neutrals. There’s a whole range from the super intense to the very neutral and that range is something a lot of people forget to use really efficiently.

We’re going to look at that right now. Our colors that we’re using again today are Egyptian violet from Williamsburg,  yellow ochre from Williamsburg, Indian yellow from Williamsburg and flake white replacement, which is to titanium white from Gamblin. 

These are the ones that I’d already mixed. 

They’re Indian yellow and white. That’s all that’s in there right now. And so I’ve got three different values. And we’re going to explore what happens to those as we add different amounts of violet to them. And then we’re going to explore violet and yellow ochre. Let’s dive in.  

Notice how dark that Egyptian violet is. It is so dark that it is almost black. A very transparent pigment, which means that as you spread out the mass tone, you can actually begin seeing the hue and you can see how violet it is. It does not take very much of that color to tint anything at all. 

One small tube will last a really long time. Let’s take just this much. You see how little is on that knife. Just that much. And see what happens to this pile of Indian yellow and white.

One of the reasons I’ve got those two piles there is so that you can see the impact of the violet and how quickly that very small amount neutralizes the yellow.  

We’ve got a really nice rich, warm brown right there. Take just a little tiny bit here. See how little I’m going very small. I’m trying to give it the same amount. So this has less of the Indian yellow in it. It’s going to go more violet, if we’re adding that same amount. And remember, there’s a little bit more white in here. So we’re getting a really nice lighter opaque tan here. 

Now, if we add about that same amount to that last pile down there, which has even more white it’s going to be even more purple because there’s less of the yellow effecting it. So, it gets much more brown as it goes down here. Then we get a light purple. That’s not quite as hyperintense as it would be mixed with just the violet and the white.  

So, on this next one, I’m going to add just a tiny, the tiniest little bit so it barely modifies that yellow and it ends up being much warmer. So, now we’re getting some great dull yellow oranges. 

Remember this last pile has the least amount of Indian yellow in it. It’s mainly white.

So this pile is going to look a little bit more violet.

Just to give you an idea of what the violet looks like when it has a little bit of white in it. Doesn’t take much. So I’ve got that much on the knife. You could see how super intense the dioxazine violet is. Massively intense.  That’s why it’s such a useful pigment. Because a little bit of it goes a really long way.  

Now, if I take some yellow ochre this time, and this is one of my favorite neutrals and purples. I use this a lot giving away my secrets here. So I’m going to take just a tiny little bit of violet here. It didn’t take much at all to begin to affect that yellow ochre because yellow ochre doesn’t have much tinting strength at all. It’s still relatively warm though. Let’s get a little bit more in this pile. So, it’s been darkening and going a whole lot more violet. 

This is why I tell people you can’t just say it’s gonna be half purple and half yellow, because if one has more tinting strength than the other half of one and half of the other is not going to give you a neutralized color, this is pretty close to being neutral, but it takes very little violet to impact that ocher. 

I’m going to try and get a little bit more of the violet in here, and at this point, that amount of violet makes the yellow ochre, basically just a carrier for violet. It becomes a very earthy purple and significantly darker than this one, you can tell when I put them side by side. But a very distinct purple. 

So that’s a look at just a few of my favorite colors and how I use them to mix a really wonderful range of neutral colors.  

I hope you enjoyed that. And it’s given you some ideas about how you can begin to incorporate more rich, neutral colors into your paintings. Don’t you just love the colors that you get when you add violet to those two pairs of yellows. I just absolutely swoon over yellow ochre and dioxazine violet.

Once you see it, you’ll start noticing it in a lot of my paintings. If this has been helpful for you, I would love to have you join me on my painting journey.

 

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How to Use Value, Color, and Composition to Make Compelling Paintings

You're invited to a special free workshop I’m hosting where I'll share how you can leverage composition, value, and color to make compelling paintings. If you missed this earlier now's the time to save your seat.  You can learn more here and find a time that fits your schedule.

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